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allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
, antidote for this low growth economic environment. it uses proprietary technology, collect data from other measurement technologies and it processes that data that's designed to tell the customers what's needed to improve efficiency of workers out in the field. especially at construction sites and new infrastructure builds. those software builds can cut fuel costs or improve customers service or safety standards. it all comes down to helping other companies to find new ways to squeeze more money out businesses. that's the kind of pitch that never goes out of style. certainly not one that the old trimble could have offered. it's a joint venture with cat pilller where their technology will be sold to cat dealerships for everything to machine control technologies. this gives the company a tremendous outsource international sales force. it looks like it's become the real deal. companies had a conference for the users of the systems. this wasn't a gigantic who la gigantic shindigs, they set a record for attendance. we're not just counting bodies. the reason so many people showed up is because t
environment, once google has seen that new rocketship, i see no reason why google should be any different. especially since google owns android. they need to figure out how to monetize it better. something the company is doing by releasing its own line of smartphones and tablets. google is sold out until after christmas. of the growth stocks, i got to admit i like google less than i did before the bad quarter if you're trying to figure out which of these stocks worries me the most, it's google, it's become a show-me situation. how about visa and master cad? both up decently since i recommended them in october. these are both plays in the worldwide switch from paper currency to plastic. visa and mastercard both reported strong quarters in october, they have healthy balance sheets. mastercard is winning new business all over the place. and visa announced a $1 billion buyback. even though visa has a new ceo, i'm a big fan of both stocks. i think they're both candidates to offer special dividends as the year unwinds. they've got the cash for certain. then there's the sherwin williams. the sto
people are. we're in a greatly diminished yield environment. people scramble for what they can. if you think yields are low know, a lot of investors think they could even go lower. it's unbelievable how low the yields are in the fixed income markets, but again, i think you're going to see compression with those types of stocks. i think what you're really going to see is dividend policies revisited contrary to the fact that from a tax point of view, folks are going to be basically less likely to buy dividend stocks because investors want income, and that's the only place they can get it. >> michael, we get a handf fufu companies every day declaring dividends. they're accelerating the payment to try to beat out the fiscal cliff. would you invest looking for companies like that right now? >> i think you're seeing the top of the dividend trade. i think if anything, what's going to end up happening is a focus back into cyclical sectors for 2013. you want the global trade. you don't want the domestic trade anymore. >> you're not going to be jumping on the bandwagon here just because companie
investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> an environment where everyone is still terrified about the potential impact of the fiscal cliff, i want to give you stocks that you can fall back on in a declining market. many strong companies, high yields. let me introduce you to weingarten, a company i've liked since '85. owns shopping centers all over the u.s. 301 income-producing properties and 11 more in various stages of development. they have a yield, doesn't have a lot of leverage. company recently sold off the portfolio of industrial assets to become a pure play on retail, and 70% of the rent it collects comes from tenants that are effectively internet resistant. they say it in their own papers. meaning they're immunized against online competition. things like supermarkets, restaurants, personal care supervisors. 93.6% occupancy rate up 200 basis points year-over-year. very bullish guidance. let's check in with drew alexander, the president and ceo of weingarten reality investors. how are you? >> pleasure. great to be here. >> now, we obviously are all very focused on the
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
. they are building and acquiring land in this low interest rate environment which bodes well for this upswing in momentum. the question as you mentioned at what point do comparisons get so tough. first quarter 2012 was first quarter where they started to see the upswing. 45% increase in signed contracts. we're lapping that now. can we beat increases as we move on? >> it could be tough. to the extent that we're building, any momentum at the bottom here, we're still building off a small base as you know. so you could have significant growth for some time. >> everything that goes into a house. a lot of spending goes into a house. >> definitely. cramer has stocks on his list that are worthy of your attention. what does he think about them? his mad dash is coming up next. later, shares of gamestop surging from summer lows hoping to score big this holiday season. we'll talk with the ceo. let's take another look at futures as we head into this tuesday morning session. we're looking about flat. more "squawk on the street" straight ahead. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between u
environment and the latest quarter, incredibly strong. blucerchiati, off the 62 cents faces and better than expected revenues. how many of those have you had? and all this is happening despite the fact trimmable gets half of it's revenues from overseas. they have serious european exposure. it doesn't seem to be hurting. the forecast is for the country to grow up 15 to 17% over the next five years. i don't know many companies like that. the vast majority of that is coming from organic growth and those are terrific numbers but they are not pie in the sky numbers. this gives them a competitive edge. when you have something like that you can take market share left and right or raise prices dramatically, either way, you can krish the estimates. the number of analysts that covered him think the company's technology is necessary for their customer's survival. only a couple players you can say that about. sales force.com, apple. market for their measurement and equipment is very underpenetrated especially in europe with 22% penetration and asia with 12% penetration. sales force.com had good numbers
is the honorable sherman, under secretary for natural resources and environment at the u.s. department of agriculture. he has a holiday message to share with you as well. [applause] >> speaker boehner, senators udall and bennett, congressman tipton and distinguished guests, on behalf of the secretary, tom vilsack and our chief of the forest service, i would like to say a few words if i can. each year, the capitol christmas tree comes from the u.s. forest service, which is an agency within usda and eachier we -- each year we select that tree from a different forest. this tree is from a small town called meeker, colorado in the white river national forest in the high mountain areas of colorado. and it's a a spruce tree and 73 feet tall and happens to be 74 years old. it's only the third time in colorado's history that colorado has provided the capitol christmas tree and i'm particularly proud of that since i'm a colorado resident. yay, colorado! [cheers and applause] >> we call this the people's tree for good reason and that's because it comes from our public lands, which are owned by al
environment. it may look cheap relative to its peers. but got to have some sign fundamentals are improving. glenn in illinois had a question about celdex, promising a line of treatments for brain cancers and advanced breast cancers. the data seen so far is pretty promising. company has a rich pipeline to support its valuation. i say wait until december 8th when they pass data on an advanced breast cancer treatment. right now the stock is run too much for me to give it my blessing like the dex. up 128% year to date this month. but if we get any significant pull back after that december 8th breast cancer data gets digested, i think celldex could be better buying the weakness. the real value right now is in their brain cancer program. why don't we wait until the week after next? if you get a big pull back, i'm going to give you permission to pull the trigger. want to be sure about a price. dnyx. excuse me. what makes me -- i'm a little gun shy on these smaller biotechs because we know we've had a couple of blowups lately. that's why i'm not endorsing that thing head on. wednesday jeff from vi
in an urban environment where spark makes a huge amount of sense. it's a great package. we'll do something here. >> one last question. we were talking about we went on. you have been in this industry for a long time. you can't remember the last time there was this much optimism in the auto industry. is it sustainable? >> obviously everything goes in cycles. we talked a little bit about that. the economy obviously here is something that's variable right now. i think the industry and i think most oems and particularly the supply base that's changed their break even points through this cycle to a place where we haven't been before. the agility of the industry and companies that are in it both supply and oem, that agility enables a huge amount of product investments and if you look at the stands at this show, the competitive products here are -- i have never seen it in the industry. it's very exciting. we can do it and make money. the industry is in a healthy point right now. >> mark joining us when you look around the show here, there's more optimism than you usually see at an auto show. comi
is likely to be in an environment where developed economies are all experiencing central banks trying to weaken their currency. >> i just want to break in here as people can see the debt go at the bottom of our screen. a man who ran nbc universal has been officially named the -- at turner and mr. zucker taking that job that has been reporteded on the last couple of days as something that is very likely, it has now been confirmed, replacesing jim wolton who has reported to be in that job. i'm just reading through the memo. >> so let's marry what you said about next year to what you can do right now. if you're going to buy suppositions in certain areas, a lot of these high dividend payers, stocks that have gained a lot this year, what do you buy now in preparation for a run next year? >> we really like large multinationals that can move resources around the globe. the strength in economies, the growth in the world is happening in the emerging world. we're very focused here in the u.s. on u.s. relations and trade with other countries, but trade is now happening, south-south trade, you ha
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
begin with feeding america, maggie? because america's food environment has so many -- is laden with problems. >> one in five children in 50 million food impoverished americans, 1 in 5 are children. i think this news really struck howard buffett by surprise in his own hometown of decatur. i think two-thirds of the high school students are taking free lunches. and that, he said, was in a town where food processing is its home. >> exactly. >> and he basically decided, this is a problem we can fix. as he says in the piece, he wants to put hunger in america out of business, which does sound a lot like his dad. >> hard to do because you have to also look at the food and how it's made and the processing is such a part of the problem because you can have a hungry child who's also obese. and it doesn't make sense, but when you look at the way food is prepared and what is fed to these children when they can eat, it's not a good option for them. >> it's not, but you know, howard says, too, that there's no shortage of food, good produce food, in america that farmers either don't farm or ha
environment again and really if you look at the economy, we're probably going back to the '90 style economy where you had 3%, 3.5% was really good growth. 2% growth which we're experiencing right now is pretty good. full employment might be 5.5, 6% like the old days. and i think with that being said, we've got to to get a little bit closer to those numbers to really have the economy start to take off. and i don't think we're that far in there. >> any much those numbers we would take. i don't know whether we are or not. wishful thinking for cantor. certainly would help you guys. why didn't you like fighting irish? >> they were on tv every week when i was a child and i'd like to see alabama win. >> alabama won last year. >> that's okay. all right. thank you. see you later. >>> in fact in some of the squawk sports news this morning, dallas beating philadelphia in sunday night nfl game. 38-33. tony romo threw three touchdown passes to break troy aikman's career franchise record. and the jets beat the cardinals 7-6. new york scoring the lone touchdown after mark sanchez was benched with tim tebo
, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> i'm brooke baldwin live in new york today. developing right now, round two for ambassador susan rice. she's meeting with the second group of her critics on capitol hill. and so far it's pretty much a replay of yesterday. the meeting that ambassador rice requested with the senators did not go as well, apparently bringing her no closer to gaining their support if rice is nominated for the post of secretary of state. >> i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign. >> i would just ask the president to step back for a moment and realize that all of us here hold the secretary of state to a very different standard than most cabinet members. >> you know the story, ambassador rice has been under really intense scrutiny for publicly repeating cia talking points that the attack that killed four americans in benghazi, back on sept
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> dolphins. playful, smart, friendly. why would anyone want to shoot and kill them? that's a question investigators are asking after at least six dolphins were tortured and killed along the northern gulf coast. ed lavandera reports on the search now for those responsible. >> reporter: to reach the crime scenes, you need to catch a ride and take a guide. this island we see off to the left is deer island where you found two of them? >> that's correct. >> reporter: a harrison county, mississippi, sheriff's helicopter and the lead biologist of the institute for marine mammal studies took us to the sight where the murdered dolphins have emerged along the mississippi gulf coast. how many dolphins turned up killed so far? >> about six or seven. we know that at least three or four of them were killed with bullets and that the other ones have been mutilated. some with their tails cut off, jaws cut off or a screwdriver in them. >> reporter: the doctor performed the necropcies. what does that tell you? >> i think it's a sick ritual of some sort. >> repor
] >> grover! >> stephanie: norquist and maria commented this is a different environment than the 1990s. grover said we got four years of bad regulation, higher taxes. he wants to add more taxes to the tea party too. it will starve tea party i if obama pushes us over the cliff. [ screaming ] >> can't just wait for tea party three. >> probably about 150 billion. >> stephanie: that would be bad. okay. oh, let's see. phillip in durham disagrees with everything i say. about everything? >> ever! >> stephanie: hi, phillip. >> caller: hi, stephanie. look. appreciate the show. i think you have not been fair to the facts and let me just ask you from the -- what we're talking about -- >> stephanie: the facts are oversensitive in my opinion. >> caller: that's why you're better as a comedian than a political pundit. >> stephanie: all right. >> caller: the fact of the matter is simply this. timothy geithner proposed a budget plan that was already presented to the senate and was voted down 99-0. have you told your listeners t
, it was the inaccessibility of my environment that made me feel the least welcome. i returned to a country not ready to receive me as a man who now used a wheelchair." that was the reality of an honored soldier who had overcome -- it was the reality that an honored soldier had to overcome until the united states improved its laws to protect the disabled, and it is still a reality in many places overseas, places where our veterans and other disabled citizens will likely travel in the future. either for business or pleasure. we must ratify this treaty because protecting the rights of the disabled is the right thing to do in the united states of america, and it's the right thing to do throughout the world. and let me just again thank senator kerry and senator lugar for their hard work on this treaty, and we look forward to our colleagues voting for it in just a short hour from now. i yield the floor. mr. kerry: mr. president, how much time remains? the presiding officer: we have 27 minutes remaining. mr. kerry: how much time on the opponents? the presiding officer: about the same. mr. kerry: mr. presid
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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